Pushing Through the Fear of Beginning

Shaun Cook, Personal Trainer

With many new beginnings, a large and seemingly immovable boulder blocks the road to success. In life, that boulder has many names but, at its core, it’s fear. And fear has one objective: to keep us from our greatest selves. Fear wants to keep us painfully mediocre, or just okay.

How do you get past fear? Push into it. It’s the only way to continue your journey to the greater you.

There’s an upfront cost to pushing forward. It’s going to take time, energy and other valuable resources. More than all of that, it’s going to take consistency.

Many people give up in front of the boulder. Lies like, “you’re not enough,” “you don’t have what it takes,” and “you’re too late,” swirl in our minds. “You have to do it perfectly,” keeps us from even starting. But when you push through the noise and discomfort, you’ll find what you thought was immovable begins to roll away.

When you push through the noise and discomfort, you’ll find what you thought was immovable begins to roll away.

Momentum. If you make it to this stage, the game changes. It takes work to keep moving forward, but less than before, because you’re already moving!

At Greenwood, we’re all on this journey together. And, together, we’re growing against the resistance. Our personal trainers are here to help you develop abundant energy and vitality, to look your best and perform at your peak ability, and to free your spirit to change the world. We’ll provide the tools for your success down this road to greatness, but it’s up to you to fearlessly lean into the boulder that’s holding you back.

Ready to start? Let’s go.

Chair Yoga is for Everyone

Join us for Introduction to Chair Yoga during Yoga Immersion Weekend on Sunday, April 29, 2:15­–3:30pm. A six-class series will follow in May.

Chair yoga is often misunderstood to be an age-specific practice. The truth is we would all be better off with a few chair yoga sequences under our belt, especially when back care is a concern. These days, with long hours sitting at the office or while traveling, none of us are exempt from the benefits of chair yoga.

Chair yoga uses modified poses that can be done while seated in a chair, which alleviates the up and down requirements of most yoga classes. It’s a safe and accessible practice for anyone, of any age, particularly for those who are living with physical limitations and have difficulty getting up and down in a typical yoga class.

Conquering the Physical Challenges of Aging

For seniors navigating the physical challenges that come with aging, chair yoga is an ideal practice to reap of the many benefits of yoga with the added support of the chair. Improved body awareness, balance, strength, mobility, circulation, lung capacity, digestion, mental clarity, stress and anxiety relief are a few of the many benefits that keep people coming back to their practice.

Managing Pain and Healing

Chair yoga can be a valuable part of the healing process for those facing the challenges that come with injury, surgery, chronic pain, debilitating illnesses or any condition that causes limited mobility or restricted activity. Chair yoga compliments traditional physical therapy and chemotherapy recovery, soothes and rejuvenates the body that struggles with fatigue, and relieves pain for many who suffer from arthritis, fibromyalgia and other chronic pain conditions.

Combating the Effects of Sitting

Learning chair yoga sequences is also valuable for anyone whose lifestyle requires long hours of sitting. We live in an age where long periods of sitting occur whether you want them to or not, and learning some chair yoga sequences will equip you with a number of preventative tools to alleviate back and neck discomfort, keep your joints well-lubricated and your blood circulating properly, and reduce muscle tension and atrophy.

Join us for Introduction to Chair Yoga during Yoga Immersion Weekend on Sunday, April 29, 2:15­–3:30pm. A six-class series will follow in May.

Fit Family: The Hudsons

Getting Stronger in Community

Christine Marquez-Hudson starts her days early at Greenwood’s Breakfast Club group fitness class. For Christine, participation in the class has lead not only to greater motivation and better fitness, but also to good friendships.

“When you finally get motivated to do something, you really start to realize this club is more than a place to work out. It’s a real community of members, trainers and staff,” Christine says. “It feels like a family. Greenwood is a home away from home for us.”

Mateo, Christine, Julia and Andrew Hudson

“You can let working out be intimidating,” Andrew Hudson explains. “But once you ask for help, the staff and trainers have a wealth of information and are so easy to approach. The more I ask and engage, the more I understand and the more excited I am. Everything is so doable with their help.”

Andrew takes advantage of the variety of classes offered at Greenwood. He participates in H.I.I.T., yoga, indoor cycling, and, his current favorite, PWRFIT. But he hasn’t always been so active.

When Andrew was 40, his doctor told him he’d be a heart attack statistic by his 50th birthday if he didn’t take control of his health. He started with small steps. One of his first milestones was running the 3-mile loop around Sloan Lake. A year later, he ran the Chicago Marathon. Since then, he’s run 15 half-marathons.

“When I ran the Chicago Marathon, I remember telling myself, ‘Look at what you can do,” Andrew says. “A regular concentration on fitness just gives me the sense of, ‘I can do this’ that translates into other aspects of my life.”

The whole Hudson family has found their place at Greenwood. Mateo (5) and Julia (8) enjoy Kid’s Club, summer and holiday camps, swimming and tennis classes, and, of course, the outdoor pool. Nick (17) plays basketball or lifts weights with his buddies.

“Not a day goes by without someone saying, ‘Can we go to the gym?’” Christine says.


When the Hudson family is not at Greenwood, you can find them skiing in Winter Park or cycling around Cherry Creek Reservoir. Christine, a UCLA graduate with a Masters from Regis University, leads the Denver Foundation as executive director. Andrew is a former press secretary to the Mayor of Denver and ran the popular talking animals ad campaign for Frontier Airlines. For the past 20 years, he has been running his popular Colorado job board www.andrewhudsonsjobslist.com and, as a professional bassist, performs in jazz clubs and music festivals throughout Colorado.

What is Functional Fitness?

Lindsey Green, Personal Trainer

I believe we all have a right to a quality life. We all deserve to live long and we all deserve to live well. But sometimes we don’t know how to achieve that on our own. We make certain food choices we think are healthy and we go to the gym to spend a given amount of time exercising because we think it’s what we should do.

As a new trainer here at GATC, I have quickly learned that I do not do things the traditional way. As someone who firmly believes working out on a machine is not the most beneficial, I have established myself as a trainer who is passionate about functional training and educating people inside the gym so they are better off outside of the gym. So what does this mean?

My answer is simple. It’s in the everyday movements you already do outside of the gym. It’s found in real, whole foods that consist of tons of micronutrients and good sources of carbohydrates, fats and protein. It’s learning how to eat and move in a way that supports a long, healthy and energetic life. It’s also about finding a confidence in yourself you never knew existed.

When you sit down in a chair, pick something up off the floor, carry your groceries into the house or put your luggage into the overhead compartment, you’re doing functional movements. They’re functional because they help you accomplish whatever task you’re doing at that given time. Wouldn’t it be ideal to train these movements in the club so we can decrease our risk of injury, become stronger and more efficient? The confidence alone that comes with being more independent and strong is incomparable.

Isolating your muscles on a given machine is never a movement we see outside of the gym. At what point in your day do you use only your triceps to move an object? The answer is you never do. You do complex, multi-joint movements. Add some weight and a little intensity and you’re not only on your way to becoming a fitter version of yourself, but you will look and feel the way you’ve always wanted to.

Doing constantly varied, functional movements at a high intensity is the answer. If you’re training with me, you’ll quickly learn there’s nothing easy about this, but it’s a really fun way of learning something new that will benefit you for years to come!

Lindsey Green, Personal Trainer
303.770.2582 x369 | LindseyG@GreenwoodATC.com