Meet our New Trainer Lindsey Green!

Lyndsey_webOriginally from Oklahoma, Lindsey was drawn to Colorado’s environment and people.  Lindsey is passionate about helping clients learn more about functional varied movements with high intensity. As she explains, its important to have different workouts and different ways of using weights to get the most out of your workout. Wondering what a workout with Lindsey might look like? Take a look!

Getting a Workout Off of the Machine: Functional Varied Movement Workout

Warm Up: Jump on a rowing machine for 3-5 minutes to warm up your body. You can stretch out your body a bit doing inchworms and banded stretches.

Start with a Strength Movement: Starting with strength allows you to warm your body up and get the most out of your strength work for that day. It’s helpful for people to know their one rep max so that I can work off of percentages with them. For example, one day we might do 80% of a back squat with low reps, another day we might do 50% with a higher rep volume. Allowing for this variety in weight percentage and reps will help you get stronger because you’re building endurance over time. It’s not always about going super heavy, but it’s important to know where you are at. Not to mention, Knowing your 1 Rep Max is a good measure of strength and progress.

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Deadlifts are also a great strength movement, but can be challenging to do properly. It’s helpful to start with kettlebell deadlifts, or siting on a box so that you are not fully squatting. Picking up objects from the ground is an important functional movement that is good for everyone, both inside and outside of the gym.

Conditioning: Depending on each client, there are a variety of conditioning methods to cycle through. For example, I often times have clients do burpees, wall balls, or full body movements to help elevate their heart rate. I am also a huge advocate of jump roping, its’ not only a great cardio but it’s a full body movement that’s working your legs, your forearms and your core which you need to keep tight while you jump.

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Scale Your Movements: The best part about having a trainer is having someone in your corner who can assess and re-asses what your body needs. Modifications can always be made to make sure you are getting the most out of your workout, in a way that encourages muscle progression and deters injuries.

Don’t go too long: You are getting more out of your work out in a short amount of time than you would be on a cardio machine. Non-machine workouts help you build muscle endurance, which in turn will help you burn more calories throughout the day. When you can get your heart rate at an elevated state, and work through time intervals, then you can maximize your time. If you only have an hour to get your workout in, functional varied movement workouts make sure you are getting the most out of your hour.

Lindsey is available for one-on-one appointments here at Greenwood, you can contact her by clicking here, or on her Instagram @lindseygreeen.

Also, keep an eye out for her new High Intensity Conditioning Class, starting September 26 thru October 19.

How to Achieve Optimal Chair Positioning at Your Desk

By Sara Talbert

As a Pilates instructor, I think of myself as a teacher of posture. When my clients walk in the door, I look at their posture and ask myself, “what are the best exercises for this person today?” When I teach Spin classes, my cues always involve “sitting tall” and “keep your neck” meaning don’t let your shoulders take over your upper body. When I ask my clients what they think is causing their back pain, they often reply with “sitting at my desk.”

Your chair is perhaps the single most important part of a healthy working environment. I’ve put together some guidelines for achieving optimal chair positioning for long hours at your desk.

1. THE BASICS

You should be able to sit comfortably in the chair, using as much of the chair back as possible for support. The lumbar support should fit comfortably into the curve of your lower back and your feet should be flat on the ground (use a footrest if necessary).

Posture Image 32. CHAIR HEIGHT

Start with your seat at the highest setting and then adjust downward until your legs and feet feel comfortable and the back of your knees are at an open angle (90° or slightly greater and not compressed).

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3. SIT BACK IN THE CHAIR

Adjust the height and/or depth of the lumbar support to provide comfortable lower back support.

 

 

4. ADJUST THE RECLINE

If the chair has a recline lock, set this at a comfortable position. Remember to unlock this periodically allowing the backrest to move with your back as you change posture. It’s generally better to be slightly reclined, as this helps relieve tension from your lower back. If the chair allows you to, adjust the recline tension as you move back and forth so that the chair provides consistent support.

5. ADJUST THE SEAT PAN

When sitting back, make any adjustments to the seat pan (e.g., seat pan tilt) to reach a comfortable position. The seat pan should extend about an inch on both sides of your legs and should not apply pressure to the back of your knees.

6. ADJUST THE ARMREST

If possible, adjust the height, width and position of your armrests to one most comfortable for how you work. Keep in mind that armrests will be used only between typing sessions, not while typing or using your mouse. Consider lowering or swinging the armrests out of the way when not in use so as to not inhibit your movement.

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7. CLEAR OBSTACLES

Make sure that the chair casters (wheels) move smoothly and that nothing obstructs your ability to position the chair in front of your desk and computer. Lastly, try and get up frequently and walk around. Find the water station at the other end of your work space to fill up your bottle. Your body will thank you.

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To learn more about posture, check out our schedule for available Pilates classes at Greenwood Athletic Club, or contact Sara Talbert for more information.